Pronto: 2014 Data Release

I sit atop a Pronto Bike  at UW's arena with Dubs, their mascot, enjoying the attention.

I sit atop a Pronto Bike at UW’s arena while Dubs, UW’s live mascot, enjoys the attention.

Well, Pronto has been around since October 13th – Tuesday was the three month mark. So how are things going? Pronto recently released some trip and membership data for 2014. The highlights from their Tumblr:

  • 5,485 System Users: We had 1,984 annual members sign on along with 3,501 casual users of the system (those who purchased a 24 hour or 3 day pass).
  • 21,026 Total Trips Taken: Averaged out, we’ve had 262 trips per day.
  • 34,931 lbs. of CO2 Reduced: 1,778 gallons of gasoline would emit that same amount of carbon dioxide.
  • 43,010 Total Miles Clocked: We totally made it around the world in 80 days. In fact, we circled the globe 1.72 times. In 80 days. Bam!
  • 1,677,390 Calories Burned: 11,981 cans of cola have the same amount of calories.

Also, check out Seattle Bike Blog’s commentary and keep an eye out for upcoming events and challenges for Pronto Members. The prize for January’s rider challenger is a $100 gift certificate!

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The New 2nd Ave…By Night

In the wake of the tragic death of Sher Kung two weeks ago, Seattle’s cyclists have anxiously awaited the opening of the newly renovated 2nd Ave from Pike to Yesler. With the promise of bike signals, protected lanes, and more visibility by turning motorists the redesign makes us hope this is the last time we must gather together and solemnly ride down 2nd Ave. Well, the new two-way cycle track opened yesterday with the help of volunteers from Cascade Bicycle Club who were on-hand to help orient bicyclists, pedestrians, and drivers to the new set-up. Unfortunately I could not make it yesterday, but tonight I put the track to a good test: night riding. I must say, I am satisfied. As you’ll see, I prepared myself for several cars to cut me off with left-hand turns but each and every one stopped. I felt safe…finally.

 

The new infrastructure has me feeling so much safer! It also facilitates traffic flow by separating turning vehicles from the regular flow and allowing them a separate turning signal to ensure cars are not blocked by pedestrians and bikes.

It’s a great system – all that is left is to make sure everyone behaves responsibly. The end result should increase safety and travel speed for all users.

America’s Top 50 Bike-Friendly Cities | Bicycling Magazine

America’s Top 50 Bike-Friendly Cities | Bicycling Magazine

How I would love to visit all these places. American urban cycling is very different from the Danish & Dutch experience and I have only been to a handful of these American leaders. 12/50 is not too bad, but unfortunately many were pass-troughs lasting only a day or two. I cannot wait to travel and see more of what our country has to offer! This map proves American cycling is no longer a west coast fantasy – a surprising number of our country’s leading cities are in the central regions and the Midwest is quickly becoming an important cycling hub. I have been to:

  1. Minneapolis, MN   |   4. Washington, DC   |   5. Chicago, IL   |   6. Madison, WI   |   7. New York City, NY   |   10. Seattle, WA   |   16. Boston, MA   |   17. Philadelphia, PA   |   24. Milwaukee, WI   |   35. Pittsburgh, PA   |   39. Ann Arbor, MI   |   41. Grand Rapids, MI